Hi, my name is Nina Ricci &
I love stories.

Read This Instead Blog Author

Hi, my name is Nina Ricci &
I love stories.

Hi, my name is
Nina Ricci &
I love stories.

I’m also a 24-year-old Aquarius. This is an important fact because according to my sister, being an Aquarius is the reason why I tend to overshare unsolicited (usually useless) facts about the many random things I read about.

You would think my family would be thrilled to hear about Schrödinger’s cat at our dinner table, but alas, my interesting stories only get eye-rolls and quick monosyllabic maneuvers at changing the topic. Of course, they’d rather hear about the ensuing fight between a neighbor’s cat and my dog when my dog sniffed that particular cat’s butt.

Every time I’d say, “Did you know…” my sister would always whisper, “You’re being an Aquarius.”

Even when she’s taking a dump and I’m talking to my dog about the composition of the bones she’s chewing, my sister would yell, “Aquarius!”

You would think my family would be thrilled to hear about Schrödinger’s cat at our dinner table, but alas, my interesting stories only get eye-rolls and quick monosyllabic maneuvers at changing the topic. Of course, they’d rather hear about the ensuing fight between a neighbor’s cat and my dog when my dog sniffed that particular cat’s butt.

Every time I’d say, “Did you know…” my sister would always whisper, “You’re being an Aquarius.”

Even when she’s taking a dump and I’m talking to my dog about the composition of the bones she’s chewing, my sister would yell, “Aquarius!”

Eventually, it dawned on me. All their sighs combined made me realize that nobody in the family loves my awesome facts, not even my dog. So, I turned to the 21st century hero of introverts: the internet. I’ve crafted this blog so I can share my epic stories and (sometimes) practical wisdom to the world (you know, since my family has had enough).

Why should you read this instead?

Consider this story:

There was one village.

A dog was born.

After it grew up, it went in search of food.

It ate some wild vegetables.

One day, there was a forest fire. The dog ran away.

After the fire subsided, the dog came back. The vegetables got cooked in the forest fire.

It found them tastier and nutritious and kept eating them. Few days later, some of it had high bacteria.

The dog ate it and slowly died.

Months later, there was another dog.

After it grew up, it went in search of food.

It ate some wild vegetables.

One day, there was a forest fire. The dog ran away.

After the fire subsided, the dog came back. The vegetables got cooked in the forest fire.

It found them tastier and nutritious and kept eating them. Few days later, some of it had high bacteria.

The dog ate it and slowly died.

Another month later there was another dog.

The same cycle repeated.

Now a human was born at the same time.

After he grew up, he went in search of food.

He ate some wild vegetables.

One day, there was a forest fire. He ran away.

After the fire subsided, he came back. The vegetables got cooked in the forest fire.

He found them tastier and nutritious and kept eating them. Few days later, some of it had high bacteria.

He ate it and slowly died.

But—

Before he died, he wrote a book, describing all of these things.

So, after the next human was born, he already knew what fire looked like, what happened when forest fires came, how cooked food kept him less hungry for [a] longer time and why it should not be eaten after some days.

So, he lived longer. During the extra-time he had, he started collecting various things like dry leaves, green stems, stones, water and animal dung[s].

And when the fire came, he was prepared. He threw all of this one by one into the fire.

And before he died, he authored the next chapter—dry leaves preserve fire, animal-dung cause slow-burning and water puts out the fire. And the one that came after him read these two chapters.

One day, when he was sitting at the place before the fire came, he noticed a spark from wind pushing the trees against each other. So he took two dry sticks and did the same thing.

Voila! There was Fire.

And the one born after him made a lighter.

And the one after this generation made electric stove.

Thus the progression went on.

Shoutout to Mr. Srinath Nalluri for the beautiful analogy.

Ever since the dawn of mankind, we have been able to pass down information and learn from them. From cave paintings to ancient hieroglyphs to info-graphics, everything is designed to teach us the basics of life.

We no longer have to forage for food and study which among them can poison us, our ancestors already did that. We no longer have to wonder how our body functions, our ancestors already figured that out.

Every generation that came before us gathered all these information and preserved it for us. Some of these are written manifestations such as books. That’s why I want to emphasize the importance of reading. According to a writer, Srinath Nalluri:

      • A normal biology textbook lets you know in an hour how your heart beats, how your reflexes work, plants respire—all of which would take centuries to discover.
      • Ancient books—written by people like Homer, Dickens, Shakespeare, Valmiki, Chanakya— give a glimpse of how past was, how people lived and what their lifestyle was.
      • Works like ‘The Wall’ show how the night feels in a jail before the day you are going to be hanged —something which you may never get to experience.

Reading does not only open a portal to viewing different kinds of lives, it actually enables us to live those lives.

Reading does not only open a portal to viewing different kinds of lives, it actually enables us to live those lives.

This is the goal of my blog.

To share information and hand them down to people who are seeking to continually grow.

This blog is full of many epic stories such as the one above plus many more interesting articles and motivational texts that will not just engage you but will prove life-changing if you just read this instead.